Monologue Must Share: Orson The Beetleslayer

For those who are embarking on the HSC this term and will be in the process of trying to look for some good monologues for their students to perform, may I suggest taking a look at the Suggestions to Monologues page (click on the link in the left hand tool bar). There are some great suggestions there. Also, I suggest reading the comments as other people offer their suggestions.

I thought I’d also share a clip I was watching the other day that I thought would make a really great monologue. It’s from Game of Thrones. Whilst a good majority of Game of Thrones content is unusable I did find this scene between Tyrion and Jaime to be quite a lovely scene. Performers could create their own character and adapt the dialogue to fit its circumstances. Anyway, I thought it was quite a sensitive moment amidst all the blood and gore on that show.

You can watch the clip HERE.

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HSC Drama: Individual Project (Performance) Checklist

I recently posted a checklist of items that I get my students to complete during the first term of working on their Individual Project. I mentioned in the post that I would blog separate lists for the activities that I gets students to complete for particular projects.

The most common project chosen is Performance so I will post about that first. I also have a to-do list for Scriptwriting and Poster & Promotion which seem to be the other projects that my students have commonly chosen over the years and will post those in future.

Remember that this carries on from the checklist in Term 1 so if there are particular items that weren’t finished from that list they can work on those over the holidays or complete those first before starting on this list. The list in this post is just for Term 2.  

CONSULTATION SCHEDULE – Stick this new schedule in for this term and ensure you are committing to your meeting time each week. After each consultation you should write a logbook entry. Date everything.

LOGBOOK CHECKLIST – Stick this in and tick off items when completed. Date and sign when each item is done.

READINGS – Read, highlight and annotate any readings about monologue preparation given to you by your teacher. If you have been reading monologues over the holidays, select your top three and present them to your teacher so that a discussion can be had as to which one should be performed for the exam. Ensure logbook entries are written after each monologue has been read and photocopies of each of the monologues is in your logbook. Write a logbook entry after a decision has been made about your monologue choice.

CHARACTER RESEARCH – Complete an investigation into the type of character you are playing or the themes and issues within your play. Look at other characters from film, TV, books or plays that capture some of these issues/themes. You may also consider conducting surveys, focus groups, journal readings, interviews. Use this to help you form an idea of who you think your character is. Write a short logbook entry describing them. Create a small (1/2 – 1 page) vision board of words and visuals that represent who they are to compliment your logbook entry.

EDIT YOUR SCRIPT – Read through your script and consider its length. Is it too long or too short? What parts need to be cut/added in order for it to make sense? What references need to be re-contextualised/modernised? Photocopy your script and make edits and cuts in pencil. Stick in various excerpts from sections of the script/book if necessary. Once you have decided on your final draft, type out your script into a Word document and stick it into your logbook. Ensure you save this as you will need it to complete the other activities on your checklist. Write a logbook entry explaining your process when completing this, any challenges you faced and how you addressed the problems.

SCORE YOUR SCRIPT – Using the guide provided by your teacher, begin your script analysis by identifying the super-objective, objective, beats and possible action/movement/gesture that is needed in each beat.

SUBTEXT EXERCISE – Using the guide provided by your teacher. Rewrite your monologue so that you are writing it as though you are inside the character’s head and speaking what they would honestly say/mean if they weren’t in conflict with themselves/others.

ROLE ANALYSIS – Using the guide provided by your teacher, complete all the questions as though you are in role. If you don’t know something, make it up so that it reflects what the character in their world would think/feel/do. I’ve written about how to do this in another post which you can read here.

DESCRIBE YOUR CHARACTER – Write down 3-5 words that describe your character at the beginning of the monologue. Write down 3-5 words that describe your character at the end of the monologue. Can you identify the main points in your character’s journey? What is the turning point for this character? When do they, if at all, begin to change?

DIRECTOR’S CONCEPT (DRAFT) – Using the scaffold provided, write a draft rationale/director’s concept of 300 words about your performance piece.

LOGBOOK CHECK – This will be in Week 7, 9 and 10. We will have a group feedback session at the beginning of our Thursday lesson (Wk 7A) in this week to tell each other what we have been doing.

DRAMA PANEL #2 – Present your draft rationale/director’s concept to the panel. Discuss any challenges faced and how they were overcome. Ask any questions of the panel as you see fit at this point in your project.

What do you get your students to complete at this point in the project? Share your thoughts below.

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Monologue Must Share: Calvin Candie, Django Unchained

I’ve got the 52 Plays in 52 Weeks Challenge but I’ve also had a little challenge going for a long while now that I haven’t talked about.

I’ve made myself a long list of films to get through in search of good monologues that students could adapt and perform for their Individual Performance in the HSC.

This one, that I just had to share, is from the film Django Unchained. Now it is rated MA15+. It is violent. There is bad language. This YouTube clip is in serious breach of copyright.

In saying that however, I just had to share this moment from the film. How Leonardo Dicaprio has not won an Oscar I still do not understand.

I was completely glued to him during this scene. I can’t really describe it. You just have to watch it. Whilst watching it however,  I did wonder, could it be performed on stage? I don’t see why it couldn’t. With a few little tweaks (namely the knife cutting the skull as blades are not permitted in performances) it could be a really good piece for a strong male actor and I always seem to find it hard to find good male pieces. Or maybe I’m just completely mental for thinking this could work as a piece of performance.

What do you think?

You can find other monologue suggestions at the top of the page under the Suggestions for Monologues section.

Fantastic Find: monologuedb.com

I’m in the process of preparing my Year 9 students for an upcoming performance. It is a selection of “monologue moments.” I wanted to use it as an opportunity to direct my first piece that had something more of a refined directorial vision than the mish mash pieces I’ve put together in the past.

The theme for the concert is “colour.” I wanted my directorial concept to explore movies that had colours in the title and the characters and moments within them. I initially began searching for movies with colours in the title to see if I could find short monologues from them. Things like The Colour Purple, Pretty in Pink and The Thin Red Line. It was harder than I thought to find pieces online until I stumbled on this website monologuedb.com

It has a great selection of very short, monologues, no more than 3 minutes or so. In the end I decided to go with “movie moments” as my theme rather than “colour” because it really was proving harder than I thought. The kids have responded really well to the monologues I chose for them because a) they suit their personality (and for a first monologue I do think that’s important in order to encourage a sense of success) and b) they know the movies that they are from which means they know how they are supposed to sound and at this stage you want them to be emulating tone and facial expression to get them comfortable with working with scripts and standing up on stage alone.

Definitely worth checking out.

Writing a Role Analysis

One of the popular pages on the blog seems to be the Suggestions for Monologues page. Once you’ve picked a monologue it is a good idea when developing an Individual Performance either for the HSC or for some other class assessment, that an actor, as part of the rehearsal process should write a role analysis.

A role analysis is something that is prepared by an actor to give them a greater understanding of their character within the context of the whole play and within particular scenes. It’s like a road map of the character’s life and requires you to draw on your own to make it believable and convincing. The actor utilises their dialogue and interactions to help form a picture of their character which they can then use to physicalise the character and make offers.

In answering the following questions an actor should be able to do the above effectively. Aspects of a character that are not clear from the dialogue and interactions in the play can be made up by the actor as part of their own interpretation.

Character Name:

Autobiographical Facts:

  • What was your parent’s upbringing like?
  • Do you have any siblings?
  • What sort of education did you receive?
  • What is your health like?
  • When have the significant major relationships in your life begun?

Interests:

  • What do you enjoy doing (music, food etc)?
  • What do you consider your idiosyncracies to be?

Physical Description:

  • How old are you?
  • What is your height/weight?
  • What clothing do you wear?
  • What are your grooming habits?
  • If you had to compare yourself to an animal, what would it be and why?

Success/Failures/Upbringing:

  • What success have you had in your life?
  • How did these affect how you turned out?
  • What failures have you had in your life?
  • How did these affect how you turned out?

In Your Scene:

  • What time is it?
  • What aspects of time affect your action?
  • Where are you? Describe your surroundings.
  • What actions result from your relationship to this place?
  • What are the significant objects relating to your surroundings?
  • What actions do you complete that relate to these objects?
  • What activities are you up to the moment the scene begins?
  • What is happening in the scene (explore the tension here)?
  • What is your relationship to the other characters in the scene?
  • What is your relationship to the other characters mentioned in the scene?
  • What has led to these feelings?
  • What do you like/dislike about them?
  • In what ways do you need the person in the scene?
  • In what ways are you vulnerable to the other person in the scene?
  • What is your super-objective (what do I wish for, need, dream about)?
  • What is it you need at the beginning of the scene?
  • What will you try to do to get what you want?
  • What will happen if you don’t get what you need?
  • What or who is in my way?
  • What do I do to get what I want?
  • What can I draw upon from my own life to help create the characters wants, actions and emotional life? Describe.

This would make a great lesson activity when doing some scene work or work on monologues.

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9 Must Watch Ted Talks About The Arts

I’ve blogged about my discovery of the Ted Talks website some time ago now and I’ve been meaning to share with you some of my favourite talks that focus on The Arts. There are some really insightful talks that get you to really connect with the Arts in a way that you may not have before or that you may not have indulged in for a time because I think we get too caught up in our day to day school lives to really think about these sorts of things.

I ask you to indulge in at least one of these that takes your interest. Choose any one which sounds interesting.

Trust me, you will feel better about what you do once you watch it.

Consider it your 20 minutes of free professional development/reflection that you may not have had in a while. Enjoy.

1. Chris Bliss: Comedy is Translation

If you teach Comedy or enjoy comedy this talk is all about the truth that can be found in comedy.

2. Charles Hazelwood: Trusting the Ensemble

Hazelwood discusses the role of trust when leading an ensemble. I think some of the ideas are translatable to other areas of the Arts.

3. Handspring Puppet Co: The Genius Puppetry Behind War Horse

The creators of Joey in War Horse share the complexities of bringing the puppets to life on stage.

4. Charles Limb: Your Brain on Improv

This is my favourite. Limb explains what happens when you improvise when playing music. I also think this is relevant in Drama.

5. Ben Cameron: The True Power of the Performing Arts

Cameron discusses how the Performing Arts must compete in an Internet age.

6. Thelma Golden: How Art Gives Shape to Cultural Change

Golden discusses the meaning of Art and how can it redefine culture.

7. Amy Tan: Where Does Creativity Hide?

Tan analyses her own creative processes to see where it starts and flourishes.

8. David Eggers’ Wish: Once Upon a School

If you’re looking for something that’s pro-public school and teachers. This is it 🙂

9. Anna Deavere Smith: Four American Characters

A great soloist performing some interesting characters. A possible source for Individual Project: Performance.

Terminus – A Review

The theatre is filled with a white haze. The stage is framed by what looks a broken mirror, some of the shards still attached. The house lights dim. There is a building of sound that becomes a roar, the lights on the stage flash quickly and brightly, catching you by surprise after being immensed in the darkness. After the shock of the bright lights, three actors appear, each standing on their own podium, dressed in the everday, lit only faintly by white light crossing horizontally across their faces. The lights fade on “B” and “C” and “A” begins to speak…

And so begins the STC’s Touring Production from The Abbey Theatre in Ireland, Terminus. It is an intense 1 hour and 45 minutes. No interval, no movement of any kind, no interaction between the three actors, just three monologues that eventually intertwine.

At first, the story is engaging as the writing skill of O’Rowe reveals itself with his clever manipulation of the monologue form into that of verse. I think to myself, “this writing is modern day Shakespeare”. The rhythm and rhyme, ebb and flow of the dialogue suggests movement and supports that of the character’s stories.

Soon, listening to the character’s stories becomes a test of your skillful ability to imagine in your own head the events that the character recounts. Tune out (which I did a few times admittedly) and you miss a part of the story. All three stories and their respective characters, are bleak and not at all what you would expect.  Terminus means “the end or extremity of anything” and the stories are certainly that. The way they reveal themselves makes listening to them worthwhile. The revelation is simple and subtle and fits perfectly within the rhythm and length of the play. You are hanging on until the last minute.

The acting is incredibly skilled and strongly supports the uniquely written dialogue. Olwen Fouere as “A” is engaging with her clear and aptly intonated delivery. “B” played by Catherine Walker was incredibly intense which I suppose was complimentary to her character but I found it a little too so. However it worked well in showing a jarring contrast between Walker’s “B” and Declan Conlon’s portrayal of “C” who was softly spoken by comparison. I was straining to hear him at times. It was not at all how you would expect an essentially crazy mad man to sound. All three actors, standing alone speaking to the audience show the isolation they all feel even after their stories intertwine.

Whilst I can look at each of the elements of Terminus individually and appreciate and praise their merit, I didn’t overly enjoy this play. It really was exhausting listening and imagining the events in my head nor did I feel anything in particular as I was leaving the theatre. If I had to feel anything it was mainly exhaustion and a feeling of “oh isn’t the world bleak?” The lack of interaction disappointed me and the monologues were incredibly long and as such couldn’t maintain my attention.

A very well written work with highly skilled actors doing justice to the material but it didn’t quite reach the heights of my expectation.

Image Credits: Dublino, mariocutroneo, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)