How About This to Get Your Kids Writing in Their Journal…?

I’ve blogged before about my gripe with the logbook. That it can be a bit tokenistic sometimes. An add on at the end of class with little focus on using reflective and literacy skills. I say this only because that’s how I’ve felt when I’m in my classroom and using the logbook. I’m slowly refining the scaffolding of writing tasks but I feel like I still have a way to go.

With my seniors I’ve posted before about the checklist of work that I get them to do to show their process. As an add on to that I’ve started something called a Drama Panel. It’s an idea I got from my Head Teacher who set it up in a similar way for Art.

I set up the classroom as if it is a boardroom in a big office. One big long table with chairs around it. Each student must attend and their parents are also invited.  I ask my colleagues to act as panelists. The panel is scheduled at the same time over three terms and culminates with the final performance evening prior to their final exam.

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At the first panel meeting I survey the parents to gauge how much they actually know about the Individual Project. I will then survey them again at the end of the process. I plan to particularly focus on how they were best able to support their child when at home as a result of knowing what was going on in the classroom.

The students are asked to present their logbook and a statement of intention. I will write about this in a future post. In the second panel meeting which will occur this term they must present their draft director’s concept/rationale and their logbook once again. The third and final panel meeting before the showcase will involve the students showing their projects in workshop mode. Meaning, Performance projects may perform the opening of their piece, scriptwriters will workshop a scene from their script etc.

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After each panel, the logbook, statement of intention, rationale and/or project are collected and a progress mark is given. Overall I have made the internal assessment of the IP worth 20% but you could weight it whatever you like. I divide the weighting up in a 5-5-10 percent ratio. At the final panel meeting the students can take their logbook and project back to make any last minute changes before it is submitted prior to the showcase. This occurs early in Term 3.

The project should be 99.9% finished at this point leaving some room after the showcase to make any changes as is necessary. I put the pressure on to have it done by this time because the students go off on their Trials early in Term 3 and their focus is not back on their project until after this time and there isn’t much time left after that!

The students must write a series of questions to ask the panelists who provide verbal and written feedback on each project which the student then sticks in their logbook.

So far my first panel was really successful. I think it is a good strategy for a couple of reasons:

  • It makes the student accountable for their logbook and their process;
  • It involves parents in their child’s work which they may not have done previously because they weren’t familiar or confident with what the project requires or involves;
  • It encourages collaboration with other teachers. It is great PD for them and it is good for you as the teacher because 3-4 brains is much better than one. The ideas I have been getting are fantastic.

So, if you’re trying to up the quality of the logbook or motivate lazy students, particularly for your seniors, maybe give this a whirl.

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HSC Drama: Individual Project (Performance) Checklist

I recently posted a checklist of items that I get my students to complete during the first term of working on their Individual Project. I mentioned in the post that I would blog separate lists for the activities that I gets students to complete for particular projects.

The most common project chosen is Performance so I will post about that first. I also have a to-do list for Scriptwriting and Poster & Promotion which seem to be the other projects that my students have commonly chosen over the years and will post those in future.

Remember that this carries on from the checklist in Term 1 so if there are particular items that weren’t finished from that list they can work on those over the holidays or complete those first before starting on this list. The list in this post is just for Term 2.  

CONSULTATION SCHEDULE – Stick this new schedule in for this term and ensure you are committing to your meeting time each week. After each consultation you should write a logbook entry. Date everything.

LOGBOOK CHECKLIST – Stick this in and tick off items when completed. Date and sign when each item is done.

READINGS – Read, highlight and annotate any readings about monologue preparation given to you by your teacher. If you have been reading monologues over the holidays, select your top three and present them to your teacher so that a discussion can be had as to which one should be performed for the exam. Ensure logbook entries are written after each monologue has been read and photocopies of each of the monologues is in your logbook. Write a logbook entry after a decision has been made about your monologue choice.

CHARACTER RESEARCH – Complete an investigation into the type of character you are playing or the themes and issues within your play. Look at other characters from film, TV, books or plays that capture some of these issues/themes. You may also consider conducting surveys, focus groups, journal readings, interviews. Use this to help you form an idea of who you think your character is. Write a short logbook entry describing them. Create a small (1/2 – 1 page) vision board of words and visuals that represent who they are to compliment your logbook entry.

EDIT YOUR SCRIPT – Read through your script and consider its length. Is it too long or too short? What parts need to be cut/added in order for it to make sense? What references need to be re-contextualised/modernised? Photocopy your script and make edits and cuts in pencil. Stick in various excerpts from sections of the script/book if necessary. Once you have decided on your final draft, type out your script into a Word document and stick it into your logbook. Ensure you save this as you will need it to complete the other activities on your checklist. Write a logbook entry explaining your process when completing this, any challenges you faced and how you addressed the problems.

SCORE YOUR SCRIPT – Using the guide provided by your teacher, begin your script analysis by identifying the super-objective, objective, beats and possible action/movement/gesture that is needed in each beat.

SUBTEXT EXERCISE – Using the guide provided by your teacher. Rewrite your monologue so that you are writing it as though you are inside the character’s head and speaking what they would honestly say/mean if they weren’t in conflict with themselves/others.

ROLE ANALYSIS – Using the guide provided by your teacher, complete all the questions as though you are in role. If you don’t know something, make it up so that it reflects what the character in their world would think/feel/do. I’ve written about how to do this in another post which you can read here.

DESCRIBE YOUR CHARACTER – Write down 3-5 words that describe your character at the beginning of the monologue. Write down 3-5 words that describe your character at the end of the monologue. Can you identify the main points in your character’s journey? What is the turning point for this character? When do they, if at all, begin to change?

DIRECTOR’S CONCEPT (DRAFT) – Using the scaffold provided, write a draft rationale/director’s concept of 300 words about your performance piece.

LOGBOOK CHECK – This will be in Week 7, 9 and 10. We will have a group feedback session at the beginning of our Thursday lesson (Wk 7A) in this week to tell each other what we have been doing.

DRAMA PANEL #2 – Present your draft rationale/director’s concept to the panel. Discuss any challenges faced and how they were overcome. Ask any questions of the panel as you see fit at this point in your project.

What do you get your students to complete at this point in the project? Share your thoughts below.

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